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View Full Version : Did my ancestor die from MND in 1871 ?



cedars
20th February 2012, 12:10
His causes of death were (1) paralysis (2) asthenia (ie weakness). Newspapers reported:
a. He had been in ill health for some months past (we know it was at least 15 months, because his mother's Will then made established a Trust Fund for his personal care etc)
b. .."his later days of which remembrances are sweet if sorrowed"...
c. "latterly the disease from which he has suffered has cut him off from all active interest in his sport"...
My questions are, in your experience does this sound like MND - or could you suggest alternatives ? And given the status of Victorian awareness and medication, could you speculate on a possible dateline for the emergence of symptoms ... ?
Would be very grateful for any insights ! Thank you.

Rachelg
22nd February 2012, 16:02
I feel its fairly impossible to know the answer to your question of does this sound like MND. It wasn't until late 1800's that ALS was even written about in medical terms so it along with many other conditions were listed in descriptive terms rather than real medical. Paralysis and asthenia and many 18th and 19th century conditions listed as debility were due to strokes.

How old was he when he died? He is mentioned in his mothers will which makes it seem he wasn't a grand old age

cedars
22nd February 2012, 17:17
I feel its fairly impossible to know the answer to your question of does this sound like MND. It wasn't until late 1800's that ALS was even written about in medical terms so it along with many other conditions were listed in descriptive terms rather than real medical. Paralysis and asthenia and many 18th and 19th century conditions listed as debility were due to strokes.

How old was he when he died? He is mentioned in his mothers will which makes it seem he wasn't a grand old age

Hi Rachel. Many thanks for your comments. My ancestor was 51 when he died. He had been a very active sportsman, playing cricket for England. He was also a Captain in the militia, but resigned his commission suddenly in the middle of the annual 4-week training ... - this was 9 years before he died, which makes us suspect possible early symptoms of a long progressive illness. His public activities soon ceased. Some time before his death his four young children aged approx nine to nineteen were dispersed to relatives and others, and his mother set up a trust for their care until lump sums at age 21. It may well be that a series of strokes cannot be ruled out. Would you say also that MND cannot be ruled out ? (I am a lay person and I am sure that you have far more insight than I into this condition.) Thanks for any further thoughts you may offer. David.

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