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Bilando
19th February 2015, 19:32
Following a DVLA letter re my fitness to continue to drive I was advised to "self refer" for an NHS assessment. The experience was friendly and relaxed but with some surprising mental exercises before going near a car. The initial driving was on a small private road followed by a drive around a built up area in Newcastle. We don't have roundabouts, traffic lights or round signs with a black border but the assessor was helpful and explained everything. So my pre test nerves were unnecessary. I am waiting for the formal letter but the DVLA can't use MND to prevent us drive ing if we pass the assessment. No charge and there is an assessment centre near you. Keep fighting it ! Ian

Bilando
19th February 2015, 19:35
It should read - no roundabouts etc "where I live". Sorry

Terry
19th February 2015, 20:16
Hi Ian;

It is not a driving test and is just making sure you are OK to drive. I think that most of us have had a similar experience with it but I think everyone's nervous.

Terry

njm
20th February 2015, 09:43
Following a DVLA letter re my fitness to continue to drive I was advised to "self refer" for an NHS assessment. The experience was friendly and relaxed but with some surprising mental exercises before going near a car. The initial driving was on a small private road followed by a drive around a built up area in Newcastle. We don't have roundabouts, traffic lights or round signs with a black border but the assessor was helpful and explained everything. So my pre test nerves were unnecessary. I am waiting for the formal letter but the DVLA can't use MND to prevent us drive ing if we pass the assessment. No charge and there is an assessment centre near you. Keep fighting it ! Ian

Ian:

I am going for my DVLA test on Thursday. I thought it was just an assessment on the road. But from what you say it sounds more complicated. What were the 'mental tests' you refer to and do they test knowledge of road signs etc. Please advise.

Charles

Bilando
21st February 2015, 08:02
Sorry Charles if I've misled you. As an NHS driver assessment centre receives people with For example head injuries or some form of dementia they test that your cognitive (brain function) skills are upto the job. So short and long term memory tests, some drawings to copy, mental arithmetic - nothing too difficult but not what I expected. Add in physical tests ie being pushed, pulled, press down, press up, run up 2 flights of stairs ......OK just kidding ! There is nothing to be concerned about. They made me feel relaxed and at ease with it all. I hope this helps. Ian

Terry
21st February 2015, 11:27
Hi Charles;

As Ian says, they have to test everything that could affect driving, but it's all low key stuff and carried out in a relaxing way. It is defiantly not an army type test.

Good luck and try to be relaxed, Terry

njm
21st February 2015, 12:51
Hi Charles;

As Ian says, they have to test everything that could affect driving, but it's all low key stuff and carried out in a relaxing way. It is defiantly not an army type test.

Good luck and try to be relaxed, Terry

Terry and Ian:

thanks for the informative replies. However my question still remains as follows: I am doing a DVLA (not NHS) assessment. is it purely a practical test or is there also a 'theory' component where they test knowledge of road-signs and situations?

Regards

Charles

Terry
21st February 2015, 17:13
Hi Charles;

They would expect you to know normal signs but won't ask stopping distances, or any difficult or unusual signs, motor way signs etc. I don't think they asked me any but did expect me to take notice of them when driving. All they want is a BASIC proficiency, what an everyday driver would know.

It is a relaxed morning and they should try and make you relaxed. You will probably drive their car but they do make allowances for that. I didn't think that I would get into there one, especially under the pressure of them looking. I told them that and they gave me time to sort it out with my wife and then came out.

Ask them if you have any problems with things. They also look at possible adaptions to a car if people need them but I don't know of any Mnd person needing them at their first test.

Hope all goes well, it is stressful thinking about it but should be easy on the day, Terry

njm
17th March 2015, 10:45
Guys:

I completed my driving test. the instructor/examiner said I drove well and gave me an A rating. Yesterday I received the letter from the DVLA. They gave me a license for 1 year only. i was shocked. i expected 3 years based on what others on the forum have said. Should I contest this? Is this unusual? Please comment.

regards

Charles

Trevorhb
17th March 2015, 10:58
I received a 3 year licence without even having a test, I am sure you should get more than 1 year.

Night walker
17th March 2015, 12:34
Hello Charles,

My husband is lower limb onset (foot drop in both feet) and he only got a 1 year driving licence back last december. I think it depends on what is affected, in his case he needs leg orthotics on both legs and 2 sticks.

He lost his pristine, never had points on his 42 year old driving (inc HGV) licence on the day we were diagnosed.
You do have your licence though so make sure you stay driving.

Cheers
Sylv

Jan
17th March 2015, 13:53
I am limb onset and received my new licence which originally was limited to this September, sent it back to them recently for a change of address, got it back yesterday and it is now limited to 2018! go figure?

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