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Chris
9th August 2011, 12:23
What would you say is best for PALS? i currently have a laptop which i share with the wife :mad: (i say share, i have to fight for it sometimes lol) I got rid of my PC at begining of the year due to being uncomfortable at the desk. When i cant get on laptop i use my phone to check emails, websites and stuff but its getting way too fiddly and ive given up trying to type on it!

What would you recommend?

G60dubber
9th August 2011, 12:28
Still use a pc & the laptop. Do have to use a mouse with the lap rather than the touchpad as too difficult with fingers. Need to do quicker input when playing poker online n whacking in raises ;-).
Did buy a motorola zoom (same as ipad, but runs flash as well) but couldn't physically use so swapped for lap top. Sarah Ez is v knowledgable ref IT stuff. OT should be able to refer you to a computer specialist to get relevant assistive software, computer control stuff etc.

I use a HTC and have a stylus pen to use with it when fingers not playing ball. May help you.

jadedjohn
10th August 2011, 10:15
chris an ipad is what i use most of the time - as adie suggested no use for weebly website editing though - i have a galaxy tab also but too small - my kids love playing angry birds on it though :-) there are loads of cheap tablets out now, my mate bought a Advent one in PC world for 179, i had a go on it, and it was pretty good.

john

G60dubber
10th August 2011, 11:12
I'd buy one just for Angry Birds, best game I've ever played :-)

Chris
10th August 2011, 12:55
love angry birds lol. I would prefer an ipad but convincing the mrs its an esencial piece of equipment that i need is proving difficult!

Jeannie
10th August 2011, 13:03
There are many things to take into consideration before purchasing a computer such as intended use?, will you be using it as a communication aid? using it indoors/outdoors or both? will computer controls such as switch, head mouse, eyegaze etc. be used? will you use it for environmental control system?

See this thread http://forum.mndassociation.org/showthread.php?593-Having-difficulties-typing-or-communicating-Look-no-further-%29

computatec
10th August 2011, 19:22
I have a desktop PC and a laptop and use both. I much prefer the desktop, but cannot sit at the desk for long. I use a logitech radio keyboard and mouse which allows me to use the keyboard on my lap instead of being tied to the desk which helps a lot. The biggest advantage of the desktop PC is having a decent sized flat screen monitor so I can see what I am doing. My laptop is a good fast machine but the smaller and odd shaped screen is a bind and it has some odd tricks, like suddenly moving the insertion point while I am typing and other minor irritations. My Must Have accessory for the laptop is a USB radio mouse. A tiny unit plugs into a USB port and the mouse is small and compact enough to use on the arm of my chair or even my thigh. Brilliant solution to the touch pad nonsense.

The biggest problem with using two machines is that sooner or later you will end up with files out of sync. I try to use the desktop for all input and just use the laptop for browsing and research on the internet.

Clive

G60dubber
10th August 2011, 20:25
good point about wireless mice, an absolute must for pc / laptop work. The good aspect about ipads (or similar) is that they're being used more and more as the platform for assistive technology. I've got the computer support peeps from NHS over next week so will let you know any nuggets I glean.

miranda
11th August 2011, 12:01
I have a desktop PC and a laptop and use both. I much prefer the desktop, but cannot sit at the desk for long. I use a logitech radio keyboard and mouse which allows me to use the keyboard on my lap instead of being tied to the desk which helps a lot. The biggest advantage of the desktop PC is having a decent sized flat screen monitor so I can see what I am doing. My laptop is a good fast machine but the smaller and odd shaped screen is a bind and it has some odd tricks, like suddenly moving the insertion point while I am typing and other minor irritations. My Must Have accessory for the laptop is a USB radio mouse. A tiny unit plugs into a USB port and the mouse is small and compact enough to use on the arm of my chair or even my thigh. Brilliant solution to the touch pad nonsense.

The biggest problem with using two machines is that sooner or later you will end up with files out of sync. I try to use the desktop for all input and just use the laptop for browsing and research on the internet.

Clive

I have been driven nuts by the random movement of the insertion point which no one seemed able to explain until a couple of days ago when Pete from Abilitynet suggested maybe my hands are dragging on the touchpad or some other key. He suggests moving the pointer well away from the insertion point when typing and in theory this should reduce the chance of it happening. Have been trying to remember to do this and it seems to work. EUREKA!

sarahezekiel
13th August 2011, 13:50
I think eyegaze is the future for all of us. Never have to change systems and the support, if you go with Tobii, is great.

Sarah

jadedjohn
13th August 2011, 14:24
I agree sarah - bit if your short sighted it does not work - i have tried it on 2 occasions and because of my strong prescription it would not work! - I will be buggered when I get to that stage!

John

sarahezekiel
13th August 2011, 14:45
Hi John

I'm very short sighted and wear glasses but am fine. I'm using the Tobii PCEye http://www.tobii.com/ui/pages/productoverviewpage.aspx?id=17397 I think they have addressed the glasses problem with this new version. Have you tried the PCEye? You can contact RSL Steeper http://www.rslsteeper.com/assistive-technology/ if you want to give it a try. I have it attached to my laptop and have a monitor.

Sarah

computatec
14th August 2011, 08:21
Hi Miranda, Pete has diagnosed the propblem perfectly. It is hard to keep hands clear of the pad while typing and I would like to find out if it is possible to switch it off, as it is redundant when usung a accessory mouse.

The best mouse

The very best mouse is the Logitech M305. Have a look and try it in your hand, you will love it. There are many others at a lower price but they are mostly rubbish in spite of carrying well known brand names. The batteries last forever and can even be switched off when you are not using the mouse.

sarahezekiel
30th September 2011, 23:24
Hi everyone

I just want to share my latest blog, 'Tobii Study Day - 29 September 2011' (http://sarahezekiel.blogspot.com/2011/09/tobii-study-day-29-september-2011.html). I gave a talk about my technology story since diagnosis. I hope some of you will find it interesting.

Sarah

miranda
1st October 2011, 10:38
Thanks Sarah - what an example to us all! Who were you speaking to? I have often wondered how professionals dealing with us keep up to date with advances in technology. My netbook with text to speech software causes amazement so how gobsmacked are people when they see you operating your device?

sarahezekiel
1st October 2011, 16:03
Hi Miranda

They were mainly health professionals. Everyone is amazed by eyegaze. I'm still amazed by it! It's really given me the ability to do so much more, I'm so pleased.

Sarah x

Crazy girl
8th October 2011, 09:08
Hi all,

My husband has an iPad which he uses with a iPad pointer pen wrapped in some kind of foam insert provided by our OT which he says works really well for him. His arms are very weak and fingers don't have much grip to give you an idea of his capabilities.

Our whole family loves the iPad and we all compete to use it but there's loads you can do on it, my husband has just found an app to watch live sport......plus it's small enough to take up to bed with you!

Tracy

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