Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 56

Thread: Emotional Lability

  1. #1
    15storeys
    Guest

    Emotional Lability

    Well, I've just had the most useless visit to my GP ever.

    For the last few weeks my emotions have been all over the place, or more to the point, my emotional display. I don't feel depressed at all (in fact I probably feel the most cheerful I ever have in years!) but despite this I'm still having hysterical crying fits and laughing episodes at the stupidest things. For the first time I've had to call into work sick because I can't trust myself not to burst into tears or laugh inappropriately.

    I hate bothering my neuro so I made an appointment with my GP surgery. Yet again I see someone I have never seen before who has no idea of my medical history. The only things she knew is that I'm taking tizanidine, clonazipam and quinine but she had no idea what for.

    I explained my situation to her and the next few minutes were just awful. First of all she said I could be depressed from the stress of the MND. I explained that I feel fine, am still enjoying doing as much as I can and feel quite happy. My medication seems to be working and apart from being really tired I'm doing pretty well. Then she said perhaps my husband isn't as supportive as he could be. I explained that I couldn't wish for anyone more supportive but even he is getting fed up with the crying fits (although he quite enjoys it when I get the non stop giggles)! Then came the thing that nearly made me blow my top...she said it could be the menopause as I am 40 now.... I've had to agree to a blood test to see if I'm menopausal and she gave me a leaflet on depression.

    She finally admitted that neurology 'wasn't her thing' and so she's have to call my neuro and see if this was a possible symptom and then give me a ring back if there was anything they could do.

    What does everyone here do when they have a problem? Are you able to go straight to your neuro to discuss it? Mine hates it if I don't go to my GP first to 'screen' my problem.

    Becky

  2. #2
    Forum Member Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    8,067
    Hi Becky;
    I cry and howl rather than laugh. I have written a fair bit about this issue in the forum. I carry a yellow laminated information sheet on Mnd, the ways that it affects me. In that, there is a section how Mnd has affected my emotions and how a third party can deal with them. Let the people around you know of your problems, and advise them on the best ways with dealing with you. The info sheet helps because I could not talk when I was breaking down. There are drugs but I have never taken any of them.
    For me it has reduced as time has gone on.
    Love Terry
    Last edited by Terry; 12th May 2015 at 20:21.

  3. #3
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Northamptonshire
    Posts
    1,118
    Hi Becky It is so frustrating not being able to make people understand that when those of with emotional lability cry, it is only rarely that it is because we are sad or depressed. Although my GP is great, trying to make her accept that I do not cry because of 'low mood' is like banging my head against a brick wall. Most of my tears (and often howling as Terry describes) are because something I hear or see is moving (as in emotional) I often have to block out things on TV or avoid emotional situations. I am sure lots of people had a tear or two at some of the olympic successes but I cried and howled!! I even cry if someone wins in a TV gameshow! Happy things make me cry far more often that sad things. As there only a few of us with this condition, we are not going to make the drug companies massive profits but I look forward to trying nuedextra when it hopefully becomes available in the UK next year. Sorry I waffled on but I find it so difficult to cope with this symptom but then I tell myself there many people coping with far worse than this.

  4. #4
    15storeys
    Guest
    Thanks everyone for your replies. I can really relate to everything you've said as the tears have been terrible for me (real wailing and sobbing) but even the laughter is hard at it happens at really inappropriate times. The Olympics was hard for me too and I can only imagine how much I'll cry during the Paralympics!

    I've spoken to work colleagues over the last couple of days and upset one yesterday by bursting into tears and wailing while he was on the phone (all because he said I hoped I felt better soon). To appease my GP I've looked at some of the websites she gave me on depression (turns out I'm not depressed at all!). I've not heard anything back from my neuro yet so it looks like I'll be having a bit more time off work. I can't complain as I feel brilliant in myself but just can't control the wailing!

    Becky

  5. #5
    Forum Member Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    8,067
    Miranda, Becky and others, perhaps we could all have a get together somewhere. At least we understand each others emotions and could have a good laugh/cry. Where would it end. I always say that the men in white coats will take me away.
    Smiling Terry

  6. #6
    Forum Member Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    8,067
    Below is what I wrote on my yellow laminated information sheet about emotions.
    Emotional Problems
    If I have an emotional break down, don’t worry too much. It may appear that the World has ended or some major trauma, but it is more likely to be several very small things added together. I am probably not hurt and not depressed, I just can’t control my emotions.
    Motor Neurone Disease exaggerates and unbalances my emotions. When it happens I can’t speak and there is not much that can be done. The best way to help me is to quickly transport me away for people and after five or ten minutes I will regain my composure. I feel very embarrassed in front of people when I am like this.
    If you can, reassure people that I am not hurt or have had any major trauma, it’s just part of Motor Neurone Disease for me.
    I find it difficult to cope with people saying that “they are sorry”, “your doing really well”, or just looking with sympathy. I prefer that you are light-hearted and a little sarcastic.
    It might be of some use if you have these sort of problems, you can show people the sheet instead of trying to talk, Terry

  7. #7
    Irene
    Guest
    John is the same he howls also and finds it so embarassing but it cant be helped.At first when he cried I would give him a hug which is a natural response but soon found this made the situation worse because that made him cry more.My daughter often lets me know if shes seen a good film,She will say Dont take pops to the cinema cos he will cry/laugh so hard that other people wont be able to hear the film so we wait then till it comes out on dvd.I dont think people understand and many times weve had the shhhhh be quiet behind us.Well I learnt not to take that and I quite often stand up and say something.Im not a loud mouth or an aggressive person but where my man is concerned I will fight the world.Terry,what you have written down is a good idea and I hope you dont mind if I copy that xxx Irene

  8. #8
    Forum Member Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    8,067
    You are welcome Irene, I done it for when I was on my own but it is handy on other occasions. Natural instinct is to hug and cuddle, don't! be sarcastic and change the subject. It is very devastating to not go out and socialize without an outburst. I have not had it affect my aggression so far Graham, I guess it like the disease and is different in a lot of cases.
    Terry

  9. #9
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Salford
    Posts
    1,272
    Decision makers assessing pwMND may say emotional lability is an insignificant problem that doesn't impact behaviour. They may say the pwMND "has a choice" on their behaviour, even under provocation. Assessors may call pwMND exhibiting emotional lability as being "disgusting".

    As with Tourettes, the MNDA must gain recognition for Emotional Lability in continuing care. Matching pwMNND with carers unaware of emotional lability is a recipe for disaster.

  10. #10
    luce
    Guest
    Sometimes we laughed too, or ignored mum or looked the other way (to stop us giggling), sometimes mum pretended to be on the phone and laughing to a conversation (mainly when she was out alone and could not stop laughing- she got her mobile out). we got to enjoy the emotional lability, especially if it was at inappropriate times
    luce

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •