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Thread: problem with left foot

  1. #1
    willsandco
    Guest

    problem with left foot

    Hello guys and gals. I have had a "funny" left foot for the last six weeks. It just feels out of sync, like it has got a life of its own. Some days, it feels as if I have to slap it down on the floor to walk as though it has somehow lost its manoeuvrability. My legs just feel leaden and weary. Consequently, I have been slower walking which is driving me mad cos I always run around everywhere! I went to chiropodist/podiatrist yesterday and she said I had a fallen arch on my left foot. Now I wonder if MND is causing it. Is it foot drop? Really don't know cos I don't know what that feels like. I have looked in "search and archive" and cant find an answer. Anyway, my questions are this: if it is foot drop, what does it feel like? Has anyone else got a fallen arch which is caused by MND? and finally, if you do get foot drop, what the heck do you do about it? Podiatrist says she can make me up a prescription for insoles which will cost 300. But, if it is foot drop, will these help in the long term? So many questions but I really don't know what to do for the best. I am hoping somebody has an answer.

  2. #2
    pete
    Guest
    Hi,
    sounds like foot drop ,in my case i got a plastic support that lifted the toes to prevent falls , by the foot catching on carpet etc,as for the heavy feeling in the legs i think we all get that from time to time.

    pete

  3. #3
    Forum Member Terry's Avatar
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    Sorry but I agree with Pete and don't think better shoes will make much difference. You should be able to get some form of support from the hospital. The ones I got were too big and unusable but most people seen to get one that fits into a normal shoe.

    Terry

  4. #4
    Treelover
    Guest
    Foot drop was my first symptom. Sit down with your feet flat on the floor, then try to lift your the front of your foot and toes up, one foot at a time. I couldn't lift one foot. I couldn't walk on my heels either, well on one only. That is foot drop. Now both feet are completely dropped and the sole touches the mattress when I lie down. If you have foot drop you need to see the orthotist, via your neuro team, they supply foot lifters of varying kinds. I had a Navigait for quite a while which helped enormously, it hooked on to laces or even a little sock with a hook.

  5. #5
    willsandco
    Guest
    thanks so much, everyone. I have sent emails to the outreach team and the community nurse has replied to say she will get back to me. I have done the tests, Treelover and I can lift both feet and both toes at the moment! I am sure the professionals will refer me on to the orthotist. They are all very kind to me. I am sure they will sort me out.

  6. #6
    Jock
    Guest
    Thanks for the advice embedded in this thread. I have right leg foot drop and I'm seeing my Neuro two weeks tomorrow, so foot support is something else to ask about.

  7. #7
    marieline
    Guest
    Hi,
    I developed bilateral foot drop about ?? 5yrs ago. It started with my reflexes going all funny, a strong wind on the knee reflex point can actually bring me down. There would be one leg going out of sync with the other, lots of cramps (was already a big problem of mine), i kept on with my life. I didn't really pay much attention to the changes happening and was very surprised when the Neurologist told me that i had bilateral foot drop. So if there is anything you can do now, please do so. I am still walking but some days i just drag one foot along when i am tired. I had to stop walking fast because i was falling too much, from knocking my toes into uneven pavement etc. These days i walk like a 100 yrs old grandma with arthritis, but i am safer to myself. Just know that foot drop can be prevented if managed early.

    Best wishes

    Marieline

  8. #8
    john
    Guest
    You will see that thiamine is linked to foot drop according to a recent discussion on alstdi. This is vitamin b1 .

    Foot drop is one sign of thiamine deficiency.

    Thiamine is involved in sporadic ALS, inflammatory bowel diseases and Parkinson’s Disease:

    Thiamine is also important for the proper functioning of the nervous system. In this instance, thiamine acts as a coenzyme in the production of the neurotransmitter (chemical messenger between nerve fibers) acetylcholine."

    Vitamin E appears to work even better when "enhanced" with thiamine (Med Rec, 1941; 154: 97-100).

    In plasma of patients with ALS as well as in plasma and CSF of alcholics, both thiamin and thiamin monophosphate concentrations were decreased so that the thiamin-thiamin monophosphate (T/TMP) ratio remained unchanged compared with that of controls.

    In CSF of patients with ALS, however, thiamin monophosphate values decreased much more than thiamin levels, so that the T/TMP ratio was significantly increased.

    The decrease of TMP with the inversion of the T/TMP ratio is a finding highly specific to typical sporadic ALS.


    ADAR2-dependent RNA editing of GluR2 is involved in thiamine deficiency-induced alteration of calcium
    .........................

    Arch Neurol. 1982 Aug;39(8):507-9.
    Thiamin monophosphate in the CSF of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
    Poloni M, Patrini C, Rocchelli B, Rindi G.

    Abstract
    Free thiamin and thiamin monophosphate levels were determined by an electrophoretic fluorometric micromethod in plasma and CSF of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), alcoholics, and controls. In plasma of patients with ALS as well as in plasma and CSF of alcholics, both thiamin and thiamin monophosphate concentrations were decreased so that the thiamin-thiamin monophosphate (T/TMP) ratio remained unchanged compared with that of controls.

    In CSF of patients with ALS, however, thiamin monophosphate values decreased much more than thiamin levels, so that the T/TMP ratio was significantly increased. The selective impairment of thiamin monophosphate production by nerve cells is likely to result from the reduction of the activity of thiamin pyrophosphatase, an enzyme synthetized and highly concentratd in the Golgi complex.

    Thiamin pyrophosphatase is known to diminish in ALS as well as in experimental motor neuronal degeneration or axotomy. Thus, the T/TMP ratio could be taken as an index of the impairment of neuronal protein synthesis in ALS.

    PMID:7103799
    ...............................

    Ital J Neurol Sci. 1986 Jun;7(3):333-5.
    Inversion of T/TMP ratio in ALS: a specific finding?
    Poloni M, Mazzarello P, Patrini C, Pinelli P.

    Abstract
    Thiamine (T) and thiamine monophosphate (TMP) levels were determined by an electrophoretic fluorometric method in the CSF of patients with typical sporadic ALS (50 cases), in other motor neuron diseases (MND) (14 cases) and in patients with upper and/or lower motor neuron lesions of varying origin (disseminated sclerosis, polyneuropathy, spondylotic myelopathy). T/TMP ratio was greater than or equal to 1 in a high percentage of patients with typical sporadic ALS (94%), in 35.7% of cases with other MND, while it was below 1 in the all other patients. The decrease of TMP with the inversion of the T/TMP ratio is a finding highly specific to typical sporadic ALS.

    PMID:3015835
    .......................

    Thiamine and fatigue in inflammatory bowel diseases: an open-label pilot study.

    Depending upon the body weight of each patient, dosage ranged from 600 mg/day (60 kg) to 1,500 mg/day (90 kg).

    The chronic fatigue syndrome scale as well as thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate levels in the blood were measured 20 days after the beginning of the therapy.

    RESULTS: Ten patients out of twelve showed complete regression of fatigue, while the remaining two patients showed nearly complete regression of fatigue compared to the chronic fatigue syndrome scale scores before therapy.

    CONCLUSIONS: The absence of blood thiamine deficiency and the efficacy of high-dose thiamine in our patients suggest that fatigue is the manifestation of a thiamine deficiency

    The administration of large quantities of thiamine increases the concentration in the blood to levels in which the passive transport restores the normal glucose metabolism in all cells and leads to a complete regression of fatigue.
    ........................

    In PD dose was 100 to 200mg per day.


    The Beneficial Role of Thiamine in Parkinson’s Disease: Preliminary Report

    All of the patients received 100 - 200 mg daily doses of parenteral thiamine.

    Within days of thiamine treatment, the patients had smiles on their faces, walked normally with longer steps, increased their arm swings, and experienced no tremors or sialorrhea. Three patients did not require carbidopa and levodopa without effects on their movements. Thiamine may benefit to PD. Further investigation of thiamine in PD patients is needed.

    http://www.neurores.org/index.php/ne...e/view/155/156
    ........................

    anecdotal info…from a LMN

    Woke up a couple of nights with my arms feeling really numb.
    Asked homeopathic and he suggested 500 mg 3 times a day.
    Followed his advice for first week and then went to 250 mg
    twice a day. Have not any problems with numbness in arms
    since. Have been taking it for about 6 weeks.
    I take the LEF 250 mg pill

    Heath

    Long read with a dose suggestion at the end. I suggest you talk to someone with the relevant medical expertise before trying.

    John

  9. #9
    willsandco
    Guest
    thanks everyone. My outreach community nurse, who is ace, has telephoned the Orthotic department and spoken to the consultant. He is going to see me on an urgent basis. How kind people are! I know I am just slowing up. Got out of the car yesterday, first stop WH Smith which is 500 yards, not for a book or a magazine, but to find a seat to plonk myself down on! I don't really want to acknowledge this but I think this MND is beginning to kick in now. Still, like everyone else, we deal with these things one day at a time, don't we? Hope you all have a good day!

  10. #10
    marieline
    Guest
    Thank you John for the fantastic advice. I will probably add Thiamine to my long list of things to buy. I sometimes take B complex but i am too sporadic. I am aware of the importance of the B group vitamins. You have just given me the incentive i needed.
    Hope you are able to get the answers you need willsandco.
    Best wishes
    Marieline

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