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Thread: Pressure Sores

  1. #11
    Forum Member Cookewitch's Avatar
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    Glad you've got the creams Anna, Cavilon worked wonders on an area Dad had that was deemed stage 1.

  2. #12
    Forum Member FlyingSoupDragon's Avatar
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    Sheepskin has wonderful properties. I use it beneath me in bed or chair. It provides a breathable surface which regulates temperature, relieves pressure points and helps prevent sores, Fingers crossed - I have never had a problem. Amazon do a range of them, try a double. Short pile 'medical' are probably best, but I use large rugs and feel like Genghis Khan in repose. LOL

    Happy snoozing -Tikitiboo!
    Last edited by FlyingSoupDragon; 2nd August 2015 at 07:58.
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  3. #13
    Forum Member Dude's Avatar
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    I have the starting of a pressure sore on my ankle bone. I put honey cream on from District nurse and a small square of silicon sheet held on with sock.

  4. #14
    Forum Member Gillette's Avatar
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    I've been reading through some of the threads on the Tips & Experiences board and came across this one.

    I have an area on the right cheek of my bottom (probably 1.5" x 1") which gets really painful. Just occasionally it gets a bit red but, most of the time, there is no discernible difference in colour.

    I am not mobile, need to be hoisted to transfer and am now unable to shift about when seated. Obviously I am pretty high risk for developing pressure sores so I am very careful.

    My MND consultant checked the area on my right cheek last time I saw him and wasn't concerned about it. However, I am very mindful of the problems that pressure sores can cause and don't want it to develop into one, so I have Proshield applied to the area.

    It was useful to read that Proshield is best used as a preventive and Cavilon as treatment.
    Dina

    Trying to keep positive, but not always managing.

  5. #15
    Forum Member Ellie's Avatar
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    Hi Dina,

    I'm sorry you've a sore bottom and I don't want to sound alarmist, but you need to act fast to stop the pressure area developing further.

    First off, your wheelchair cushion isn't good enough for you as you're at very high risk for pressure sores, so your OT needs to assess you and give you an appropriate cushion (most likely air or gel) Proper pressure relief cushions are expensive, but much, much cheaper than treating pressure sores, which are notoriously difficult to heal. You should use the tilt function on your wheelchair a few times during the day to redistrubite your weight on the seat.

    If you use a riser-recliner armchair, you'll need pressure relief for it too, as you will for your bed - the OT will look at these too.

    Both Proshield and Cavilon are barrier creams (Cavilon isn't a treatment cream) and do the same job but Cavilon is more durable with respect to moisture.

    Secondly, I'd trust the opinion of a Community Nurse on pressure areas more than that of an MND Consultant, no disrespect intended! Pressure sores are those nurses' bread and butter. Or an MND Nurse, if you don't see a Community Nurse. (If you attend a hospice, their Nurses are the best for spotting pressure areas!!)

    Pressure areas can be in tissue under the skin before they are visible as discoloured skin on the surface.

    So, that's what I meant about not wanting to sound alarmist but prevention is absolutely better than cure in this case...

    Best wishes.

    Love Ellie.
    ​Diagnosed 03/2007. Sporadic Definite ALS/MND Limb Onset.
    Eye gaze user - No working limbs - No speech - Feeding tube - Overnight NIV.

  6. #16
    Forum Member Gillette's Avatar
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    Hi Ellie,

    It's ok, I'm not running around in a panic at what you've said. I have been keeping an eye on things as I know how awful pressure sores can be. My brother-in-law had one that just wouldn't heal for months so I know I have to be careful.

    My local Wheelchair Team are due to come and see me about changing the cushion in my wheelchair. I do use the tilt function on the wheelchair to ease the pressure.

    I am being a good girl and looking after my sore bottom, honest.

    I have an air cushion in my armchair and an air mattress on my profiling bed
    Dina

    Trying to keep positive, but not always managing.

  7. #17
    Forum Member Terry's Avatar
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    Hi Dina,

    I am pleased that you realise that you are at risk and be very careful.

    Do mention it when trying to get equipment as it is a lot more expensive for them to deal with sores and more painful to you.

    Love Terry

  8. #18
    Forum Member Ellie's Avatar
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    It's bad but good that you know how serious pressure sores can be, Dina.

    Do you think your air mattress and air cushion are good enough?

    Hope you don't have to wait long for your wheelchair cushion - there are many types of pressure relief cushions available, so if the first one doesn't improve your comfort, don't despair, there is one out there for you!!

    And you won't know for sure how good a cushion really is until you've sat on it for a day or two - so remember to reserve judgement on it when wheelchair services first give you the cushion...

    Take care.

    Love Ellie.
    ​Diagnosed 03/2007. Sporadic Definite ALS/MND Limb Onset.
    Eye gaze user - No working limbs - No speech - Feeding tube - Overnight NIV.

  9. #19
    Forum Member Kayleigh's Avatar
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    Thanks for re-posting the thread Dina. Pressure sores are not something I knew much about and so these posts have been very useful to read. If I get any suspect red patches I will make sure I get them checked out.

    I find that this forum is a great mine of information and tips, including lots of important issues such as pressure sores, that healthcare professionals have not told me about yet.

    I hope you and everyone in this forum family are having a lovely weekend.

    Love Kayleigh xx
    Last edited by Kayleigh; 13th July 2019 at 17:17.

  10. #20
    Forum Member Ellie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kayleigh View Post
    If I get any suspect red patches I will make sure I get them checked out.
    Before an area gets red Kayleigh, the skin often first looks 'dry' or greyish and is a painless warning sign that the tissue below isn't happy - the redness and soreness appear later.

    And you need eyes in the back of your head too, or rather people who can keep an eye on your back and other parts you cannot see yourself

    I am fortunate that my carer spotted a 'funny looking' bit of skin on my very prominent shoulder blade, which was the start of a pressure sore. I got gel pads from my OT whilst waiting for a new backrest.

    But yes, you're right to be very vigilant re your skin integrity - another thing to add to the list

    Love Ellie.
    ​Diagnosed 03/2007. Sporadic Definite ALS/MND Limb Onset.
    Eye gaze user - No working limbs - No speech - Feeding tube - Overnight NIV.

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