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Thread: Sleeping in Recliner

  1. #11
    Forum Member Ellie's Avatar
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    Hi TC,
    I had one with foot supports but hated how it looked. What a Diva I am!
    I can comfortably recline when I'm awake.
    I rarely snooze during the day and if hubby isn't available to be a footstool, I'll have someone fetch a stool for me. I promise.

    Love Chimp.

  2. #12
    Forum Member Nettie B's Avatar
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    Yes. I remember now. Trevor's definitely had weight adjustment too. Because of cat at first I put a blanket under the bottom sheet to protect the mattress. One of the first carers who came told that it would prevent the air adjustment working so well. I had noticed some permanent dips appearing and Trevor was no more than 9 stone by then. It was better after I took it out and he just had a sheet under him
    I

  3. #13
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    Hi all, my husband Dave sleeps in a recliner too - like you Ellie he has 'no arms' but can move his legs to adjust position. He doesn't WANT to lie down in a bed, even though the different nurses all seem to think he should try. But he sleeps very well in the chair. The main problem now is breathing - he has a Bi-pap he's supposed to use at night, but how can you strap a mask on someone's mouth and nose when they can't take it off themselves? It seems to me I would have to stay awake all night in case he needed to take it off and get up. There are other fastenings available, but even getting into the hospital is a blinking problem - they told him to "drop in" to the sleep clinic yetsrday but with the queue to the car park out of the grounds and halfway down the dual carriageway, there was no way he was going to wait in a traffic jam.

    This all getting a bit scary.

  4. #14
    Forum Member Ellie's Avatar
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    Hi Dabchick,
    If he wants the Bipap mask off, he can set off the machine alarm by wriggling his head and/or chin around and deliberately creating an “air leak”. You’ll hear it, if you're in the same room as him.
    If he can't wriggle his head much, could he push a big-buttoned wireless doorbell with his foot or leg to call for you? That way you could be in a different room.
    You need your sleep, so no need to stay awake for a "just in case" moment. There are usually solutions.
    Ellie.

  5. #15
    Forum Member Nettie B's Avatar
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    There are masks with magnetic clasps to do them up. These are much easier to undo but again there needs to be a way starting the process off. Using head movement sounds the way but I'm stumped there. We had to use various bells but Trevor had just enough hand/arm movement to ring them unless Ellie's idea world.
    As Trevor became weaker we used a very lightweight bell. Eventually though, I became exhausted from so much disturbed sleep every night that the GP fast tracked Continuing Health Care. Your husband would easily qualify!!! This meant that someone whose job it was to be awake all night was with him all night and I had more energy for the daytime time needs. He needs the attention during the night with loss of arm/hand function which is the pits!! BUT ALSO you need sleep or you'll both struggle even more. XX Nettie.

  6. #16
    Forum Member Dude's Avatar
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    Hello When I was getting my bipap from hospital I was told I couldn't have a mask that covered my mouth and nose because I slept alone and so I have one that covers only my nose. I go to sleep about 10pm with 2 Zopiclone 7.5mg and wake up at 2am ish. I then take it off as I still have some arm use. On the 'foot alarm' suggestion, I have a Hello Kitty bulb horn on my shower chair, which I squeeze once to let carers know if I have done a wee and twice for, yes you guessed it. Am I too rude. I guess the same could work fitted on footboard.
    I also use a wireless bell push which rings a bell downstairs and also in my sleepover carers room, but I have had a situation where the alarm in carers room did not work so I had to press my 'lifeline' button. They come within 15 minutes, woke my carer, had a brew and left. Carer fiddled with batteries and it was all systems go. Hello Kitty (other bulb horns are available).
    Take care
    Dude

  7. #17
    Forum Member Dude's Avatar
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    Hi Anna
    I have a Meditech 2000 as well but I weigh 84kgs which is on the border of getting a different weight range of mattress,
    it's OK when I first lie down but gets lumpy as I move about.
    I'll sort it now.
    On the legs hanging over recliner problem, an earlier post motivated me to try a stool. I tried a small one we have in stock with a cushion
    on top - Result, Heaven. The stool has to be small enough to allow you to spread your feet around, so I just spread my feet, recline so my feet are higher than stool, close feet and lower feet onto stool. Straight legs and resting sinews and stuff.
    Thank you
    Dude

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