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Thread: Ropinirole

  1. #1
    Forum Member
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    Ropinirole

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...65614719302743

    do you know what are their expectations from ropi ?

    what is the mechanism of action of it for the good of als?

    thanks

  2. #2
    Forum Moderator MNDConnect's Avatar
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    Hi Timm

    I have contacted our Research Team for some information on Ropinirole and the paper that you have linked. I will post their response as soon as I hear back from them

    Best Wishes

    Rachel
    MND Connect Adviser

  3. #3
    Forum Moderator MNDConnect's Avatar
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    Hi Timm

    Please see below the response from our Research Team

    Best Wishes

    Rachel


    ROPI is a ‘non-ergot dopamine receptor agonist’ usually used to treat Parkinson’s disease and Restless Legs Syndrome. An agonist is a substance which initiates a physiological response when combined with a receptor.

    It works by tricking the brain into thinking the drug is dopamine, meaning it can mimic the way dopamine works – so reducing symptoms. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter, which means it send signals from the body to the brain. It plays a part in controlling the movements a person makes, as well as their emotional responses.

    It is thought that ROPI can be useful in MND from its effect on D2R, which is a dopamine receptor. It has been suggested that autophagy – the cell’s ‘waste disposal’ system that degrades abnormal proteins – may be activated by D2R agonists, such as ROPI. One of the hallmarks of motor neurons in people with MND is a build-up of the protein TDP-43. ROPI also represses neuronal hyperexcitation – another element thought to damage motor neurons in MND. These effects have been observed in a cell model of the disease.

    The article suggests that a Phase 1/2a clinical trial is underway, or will be shortly, although I can’t find any mention of it on clinicaltrials.gov. This trial will test the safety, tolerability and effectiveness of ROPI in a small group of people with MND. This is very early in the clinical trial process. If it is successful, the drug will move into more clinical trials involving larger groups of people. However, it is likely to be a long time before the drug is licensed to treat MND. It may never be licensed.

    Please remember, we are not healthcare professionals and the content of this email is taken from the evidence available.

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