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  • Suefromwakey
    replied
    I have been hoisting (ceiling) since last Friday - as with all things its a bit of trial and error but I feel we are getting there, its just time consuming, I do most of it and Albert uses the remote, as he likes remotes of course, we use the open sling which means I can get him on the commode and push him over the loo while he still has the sling on.

    Shower days I take the sling off when he's on the commode/shower chair, once he's top half dried put the sling back on (awkward whilst sitting position), hoist him on the bed, take the sling off, dry the bottom half, dress him and put the sling back on, bobs yer uncle - this I reckon takes about about an hour and 15 minutes - the clock is on and I aim to revise this!

    Think he looks vulnerable on high but he says he feels ok, one thing I would say though is you defo need access to both sides of the bed

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  • Ellie
    replied
    Ceiling hoists are OK for one person to use, it's the other hoists which (allegedly) take two people to operate, in an OT's rarefied world anyway 🥴

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  • Nettie
    replied
    Yes ceiling hoists Ellie, yeah I should of gone on DIY SOS they’d have done a better job and quicker 😬

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  • Ellie
    replied
    Originally posted by Nettie View Post
    Phil has just recently done his hoist/sling training
    Also measured up for one to fitted downstairs today
    Is that for ceiling hoists Janette?

    Following your saga on having your home adaptions done makes me realise why people contact DIY SOS, and it's not for their 15mins of fame... xx

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  • Nettie
    replied
    Phil has just recently done his hoist/sling training they’ve given us wendylet sheets an extra handrail for the bed and a wedge to help him to roll me on his own, just waiting for the correct shower chair and review of my wheelchair before we can use it though 🤦🏼‍♀️
    Also measured up for one to fitted downstairs today 😬

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  • Ellie
    replied
    Originally posted by Susie View Post
    Ellie That's the kind of hoist we were expecting to use, but we've been told we cannot have one like that as it needs 2 people and my husband can't use it on his own.
    1 Can they be used by one person (husband)? We like to try.
    That's why I said to have a neighbour, friend or family trained in using the hoist to satisfy the OT, then your husband can see if he can use it on his own and, the overwhelming experience of family members is Yes, one person can do it, Bowler being one example.


    Originally posted by Susie View Post
    2 How on earth do I get into that sling? Two legs that don't work and now arms, shoulders and core have decided not to play nicely either.
    The slings are designed for people like us Sue, they are U-shaped, open bottomed for toiletting and, as Bowler said, not something you "get into".

    In bed, lying flat, the sling can be pushed under you from the sides and under your thighs, buckled, then attached to the hoist - getting the sling on and off takes practice but becomes routine whether it's put on in bed or in a chair. The sling is probably the most involved aspect of using a hoist, the hoisting itself is a doddle. xx

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  • Mary C
    replied
    A consideration by care agencies is moving and handling and as Bowler said most agencies will say 2 carers are required to support safe transfers.
    However the reality is many carers, partners etc manage to use hoists single handed,
    Best wishes
    Mary x

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  • Bowler
    replied


    1 Can they be used by one person (husband)? We like to try.

    I managed easily to operate one of those on my own. If you have carers come in they will require two people.

    2 How on earth do I get into that sling? Two legs that don't work and now arms, shoulders and core have decided not to play nicely either.
    [/QUOTE]

    It’s really easy for your husband to get the sling on you so don’t worry. Don’t think of you getting into it but of it being slipped around you.

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  • Susie
    replied
    LindaB thanks Linda for the new topic info.

    Ellie That's the kind of hoist we were expecting to use, but we've been told we cannot have one like that as it needs 2 people and my husband can't use it on his own. My thought is, just watch us!

    1 Can they be used by one person (husband)? We like to try.

    2 How on earth do I get into that sling? Two legs that don't work and now arms, shoulders and core have decided not to play nicely either.

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  • Mary C
    replied
    The trouble with MND it seems a piece of equipment Is issued and the physical changes occur and then another assessment is needed.I have just got a date set to return unneeded equipment asap.However I am very grateful to my OT for problem solving as my needs change.
    Best wishes
    Mary x

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  • Lynne K
    replied
    I could do with being hoisted now but the Council are dreadfully slow. But luckily I can just about transfer from my RR chair to powered wheelchair using my walker and from bed to wheelchair. But it’s getting harder. I’ve been waiting over two months already for the approved adaptions to be done. My OT added a request for ceiling hoists a few days ago but it doesn’t bode well when I’ll have them xx

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  • Deb
    replied
    Oh Sue, I hope this gets easier for you. I know exactly how you feel about a hoist. ( I've posted about the spectre of it lurking in our spare bedroom !😱😈)

    I dont know why it feels so pitiful... more so than a wheelchair. We have a mobile one for when we need it. When my OT came to show us how to use it she said she could tell by my face how I felt. I can't remember who said it but I was advised not to have any mirrors close at hand !

    I'm no building expert but I was told that our ground floor apartment would be suitable for ceiling tracks because there is concrete between the floors. ( I think this is right !) and they are less intrusive than mobile hoists .I suppose we will get used to it and see it as an aid to keep us moving around. I know if it was the other way round we would have needed a hoist sooner as i wouldn't have had the strength to do what Stuart does. I possibly wouldn't have his patience either !

    Hugs to you both. I hope you had luck getting an appointment at Seacroft.
    Love Debbie x

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  • Lynne K
    replied
    Ah, Sue I hope that usIng the hoist becomes easier both practically and emotionally. I’m sending you hugs 🤗 and love ❤️ xx

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  • Ellie
    replied
    Originally posted by Suefromwakey View Post
    Ive not stopped being emotional about it FGS
    It's the bit of kit I loathe most Sue, ridiculous as it's by far the most useful thing I have 🙄 It improves my quality of life immensely, yet I hate the sight of it, so you're not alone... 😘😘

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  • Suefromwakey
    replied
    We had a ceiling hoist fitted about 2 months ago but didnt get to use it until yesterday as Albert was waiting for his "Care Chair" - I'd have to say I burst into tears when they showed me how to use it, to see him there dangling and being totally controlled by others is not nice,

    I am trying to drum the sight out of my head - Ive now done 2 by myself and this is how it will be from now on - hes had to get to grip with the fact that its needed,

    It doesn't save any time in fact its a long winded job, doing the toileting then the showering and then the dressing, Ive not stopped being emotional about it FGS

    Sue

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