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MND in Simple Terms

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    MND in Simple Terms

    Hi team,

    So it's come to light today that my dad doesn't seem to full understand how MND is affecting my mum.

    My mum is believed to have the PMA form of MND. She's had it for about 18 months but was officially diagnosed last July. Started as what was thought to be drop-foot, and still is localised to her foot, but ever since her diagnosis and her being more 'aware' of it, her leg is now aching more (due to the various ankle straps, etc, that she has to wear) meaning her leg gets tired after walking a bit of a distance.

    We all assumed that my dad understood about the muscle wastage and how it would progress - but it's now come to light that he does not. He doesn't understand how if it's localised in her foot, how it's therefore causing her leg to be tired, and why can't she walk very far, etc etc.

    Without being condescending to my dad, I was hoping to see if there was some kind of resource that explains my mums symptoms and it's progression in simple terms (even perhaps in the form of a booklet that you may give to a child, etc).

    My mum wants to get a mobility scooter so that she can do things like pick the grandkids up from school, go for days out at the zoo, etc, and be able to get around without having to rest every 5 minutes. My dad is MASSIVELY against her getting a scooter, because he is worried that she will use it as an excuse to stop walking completely (which is obviously not what my mum wants it for - she wants to keep walking as long as possible). So if anyone can please point me to any material I might be able to print off for my dad, it would be greatly appreciated.

    Many thanks

    Luke

    #2
    Hi Luke;

    Get a scooter!

    It will enable your mum to live a life and get around. You said on your other post that she needs to rest a bit and sitting down whilst moving is quite nice especially on days like this.

    Tell her to be careful of curbs etc. She can always park it at places and walk a bit, I used to carry my walker on the back of it.

    What type of one she gets depends on what she wants to do with it and if she wants to put it in the boot of a car.

    Some are easier to control than others, it is good to have one with a gentle speed controller that is easy to drive very slowly, some are a bit aggressive.

    Love Terry
    TB once said that "The forum is still the best source for friendship and information."

    It will only remain so if new people post and keep us updated on things that work or don't work and tips.

    Please post on old threads that are of use so that others see them and feel free to start new subjects and threads.

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