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    Bypap machine advice?

    Hi everyone, I'm needing a bit off advice, I received a call from my dads mnd nurse, and he had his oxygen levels recorded 2 nights ago, she has told me that his levels are to low and mentions this bypap machine, I've to speak to my dad about it tonight and call her back tomorrow as to whether he wants this intervention.

    What I'm really needing to know is one if anyone on here uses this every night and if the can describe what they thing about it and how it feels?.

    Also I want to know how to break this to my dad as I know he is not going to take this well, can anyone give me some positive advice on how to tell him this information? Without worrying him.

    I really wasn't expecting to receive this call as I thought he was far away from needing anything like that, feeling really worried now .... Katrina x

    #2
    I am on bipap. It takes a bit of getting used to the mask, although there are several types available.

    He will feel much better in a morning after a night on bipap. More energy, more alert etc.

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      #3
      Katrina It really is no big deal. I've had 1 for at least 2 years. Mask fits over nose and Dad can remove it easily. I don't always use it or if I wake up in the night I take it off. It delivers a small amount of air as Dad breathes . Dude x

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        #4
        Hi Steve/Dude, thanks for that information, she told me that it pushes air in and sucks it out again, does this not feel weird?, what happens if you breath at s different time to the machine?, sorry these are prob silly questions, but it all sounds strange to me.

        I'm not sure how to tell him, im trying to go in the positive approach as to how he will benefit from it, (he barely likes taking tablets let alone all this).

        Katrina x

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          #5
          Like Dude says, it delivers a small breath of air to help inflate the lungs. It keeps CO2 levels down whichcan cause headaches, fatigue, nausea etc.

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            #6
            It coordinates with your breathing so you don't fight against it. You soon get used to it.

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              #7
              Coordinates - that the bugger i was looking for. It doesn't suck breath out, it just responds to Dad 's breathing . You can try it first to show him.

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                #8
                Ok thanks guys, maybe I could try it out to show him, they were also talking about some monitor for on his ear?, have either of you had that?x

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                  #9
                  I have a bi-pap and can usually sleep with it on all night, it does help me with more energy

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                    #10
                    Hi Jan/Steve/Dude, that's great that it gives you more energy, can I ask how long you've been on this machine?... Katrina x

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                      #11
                      Oh also next to say, they said his sats were sitting between 80-90, the lower end being for 20mins only and averaging at about late 80's early 90's,, not sure what all that means.. Katrina x

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                        #12
                        The ear thing measures CO2. 6 is the upper limit ideally. The BIPAP will help with SATs by giving his chest a rest. It is the oxygen saturation level in the blood.

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                          #13
                          Normal blood oxygen levels in humans are considered 95-100 percent. If the level is below 90 percent, it is considered low resulting in hypoxemia. Blood oxygen levels below 80 percent may compromise organ function, such as the brain and heart, and should be promptly addressed.

                          The O2 levels are normally less in the elderly and when you are sleeping.

                          Also Co2 levels are quite important for us and 5% is considered as normal.

                          They use a monitor on the ear to measure the Co2 level or just take a very little blood from there to test it.

                          Love Terry

                          Amended after Steve's advice.
                          Last edited by Terry; 2 November 2015, 17:44.
                          TB once said that "The forum is still the best source for friendship and information."

                          It will only remain so if new people post and keep us updated on things that work or don't work and tips.

                          Please post on old threads that are of use so that others see them and feel free to start new subjects and threads.

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                            #14
                            Blood gas isn't the only way Terry, i've just spent a month on a resp ward, trust me A TOSCA can be fixed to the ear and give a reading.

                            It would be impractical to do a ABG every day.

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                              #15
                              I didn't know the machine could help with fatigue and energy so hoping if my dad does get it after his hospital stay tonight it will help with that. He keeps saying he's exhausted and done in at the mo x

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