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Losing use of arms

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  • Beemer
    replied
    Thanks for the photos Tess
    Thats an interesting machine, certainly a couple models up from the manual NE.
    I wouldnt mind the mechanical arm though, for perhaps eating and doing jigsaws, which my wife and I are attempting. We have completed one between us, but I cannot reach across the jigsaw without dragging pieces off the table.

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  • denise
    replied
    Oh Tess you are wonderful. You really make me feel a bit better. Xxxx

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  • Tess
    replied
    IMG_20210218_210806.jpg
    So this was this evening trial. He's next door watching the Rangers-Antwerp match on the computer and I'm making sure the neater eater is functioning with 'Sex and the city ' on in the background and some lovely H20 in the bowl. We have this device on loan over the weekend to trial. I've set it up with the 3 peddles instead of using the touch screen for him. Fascinating piece of equipment but unsure how practical it'll be for us. Certainly nerve wracking at first when it comes towards the face...you go a bit cross eyed.

    My partner's got what I call a beige taste. If the plate is pretty beige (chips and nugget type) then he'd be happy, however I don't believe this device is quite at the standard where you can dip a chip into some tomato ketchup.
    Instead of using my brain (as it's a tired one these days), I wish it came with meal options to go with the device. I'm assuming soup or porridge? (That I can't see him eating right now). I'm not sure if a weekend Chinese would work, however he did say when dropping it off that all food must be cut to spoon size or smaller.

    It's a relief that robots haven't quite outdone humans just yet, (but in saying that this would be useful in this instance). Give it 10 years, it'll be pickin' and dippin' haha.

    IMG_20210218_210448.jpg

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  • Tess
    replied
    Ok we will do.

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  • Bowler
    replied

    Bowler was the arm support good for any other tasks other than eating? This was mentioned also, but I was trying to think on the spot what tasks it would be useful for...[/QUOTE]

    Tess when Ann had hers we were only shown one and that was the one in my earlier comment. To your question yes it allowed Ann to reach across the table to pick things up. Once the hands went so did the neater eater. It did come apart easily which meant we could take with us on our trips to Spain. Anything motorised sounds the way to go for the long term. Chat to your OT and see what they recommend.

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  • Tess
    replied
    So I've just realisd my post above repeats everything that's already been said in the thread. I should read the thread fully first next time- deary me.

    Bowler was the arm support good for any other tasks other than eating? This was mentioned also, but I was trying to think on the spot what tasks it would be useful for...

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  • Tess
    replied
    Don't get me wrong positivity and humour isn't always a daily occurence but we do have to make the most a shitty card we've been dealt.

    We had the neater product demonstration today and I have to say pretty impressed. I didn't realise there was more that one neater eater. The device he showed us was controlled by a tablet and fully picks up food, turns your bowl for you and can be set where you mouth is ( I thought there was only the arm thing that you pull towards you for eating). So we may trial this...I guess it's all about giving some control and independence back to individuals.

    The neater drinker with motor looks ideal straight away. Long rubber straw you place into cup and then with a peddle or soft touch button, the wire moves the straw away so you're not watching TV with a straw in your face.

    We were told the inventor of the neater products is a guy from Buxton and he's quite eccentric and can ride a unicycle etc (just if you wanted to paint a picture there).

    Anyone else had good (or bad) experiences with the neater products?

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  • denise
    replied
    Well said Matthew and Tess. Stephen can still eat but his hands make it almost impossible. It certainly makes mealtimes awkward. I want him to try and feed himself but be able to step in if it gets too much. I know it's stressful for him and I know he's going to dislike me taking over. He used to love eating out but I'm not sure how we will manage that. Suppose it will depend on the menu. 🤔

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  • matthew55
    replied
    Reading these makes me realize how lucky I really am. I can't eat or drink anymore but I still have my arms and legs. Be greatfull for what you have not pining for what you've lost I say. 😁x
    ​​​​​

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  • Deb
    replied
    I tip my hat off to you too Tess. I love your positivity and sense of humour.

    I try not to think too far ahead but being fed by others fills me with dread. This is me being irrational when you consider all the other indignities of MND. Your description of popping on a film and getting on with it is reassuring .

    Hugs to you and your boyfriend,
    Love Debbie x

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  • Bowler
    replied
    Originally posted by Tess View Post
    Love the creativity Babybouncer360 bravo! When this journey began, I pictured myself in a workshop creating all sorts of gadgets, but in reality that never happened.

    We've been using plastic straws up till now for drinks with a wee Neater demonstration happening tomorrow actually, specifically for the Neater Drinker devices as with him having no arm use what so ever the Neater eater would be pointless at this stage. So I just do the feeding and we just pop an episode of something onto the TV or computer while we eat.
    Tess what an amazing young lady you are. You and your boyfriend have sooo much to contend with yet it appears you are able to adapt. Your sense of fun and humour will undoubtedly help you on your journey together. As an oldish gentleman I tip my hat to you.

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  • Tess
    replied
    Love the creativity Babybouncer360 bravo! When this journey began, I pictured myself in a workshop creating all sorts of gadgets, but in reality that never happened.

    We've been using plastic straws up till now for drinks with a wee Neater demonstration happening tomorrow actually, specifically for the Neater Drinker devices as with him having no arm use what so ever the Neater eater would be pointless at this stage. So I just do the feeding and we just pop an episode of something onto the TV or computer while we eat.

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  • Beemer
    replied
    Originally posted by Babybouncer360 View Post
    Hello! Posting on behalf of my parents. My dad has MND and lost the use of his arms first (still able to use a remote/text on phone...). My brother made this for him to use at meal times. Essentially a round bit of wood and a lazy susan at the bottom. 12 little bits of tubing hold 12 spoons and he can rotate it himself at the bottom. My mum plates him up a normal meal and then ours loaded spoons on it for him. He didn’t want my mum to feed him and this means he doesn’t have to stoop to try and get food off a plate. Hope this helps....I had a video but it wouldn’t let me upload!
    Love it Babybouncer360 , the spoons come out and could be replaced with a fork n food.

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  • Lynne K
    replied
    Welcome to forums Babybouncer360 and well done for your brother about his creation for your dad. Lynne

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  • Bowler
    replied
    This type allows for movement across surfaces as well as giving support for eating. I’m sure your OT will sort the best option for you. Hopefully not too long await.
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    This gallery has 1 photos.

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