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    walking stick?

    Hoping for some advice again from you lovely people. Husband can be unsteady on his feet, walks rather stiffly and has already had one fall. Can anyone recommend a type of walking stick I can get him to help, he has very little use of his right arm and his left is getting quite a lot weaker now. He broke down when OT delivered a bath bench as it screamed 'disabled' at him and he was so upset that I would like to get him a 'nice' one if it was at all possible. He is really struggling to come to terms with his diagnosis and anxiety can be quite overwhelming for him. Thank you for any help as always xx
    Carer for my husband who was diagnosed with ALS on 15.12.21.
    Trying to think of only today and tomorrow
    Alison β™₯

    #2
    I've bought ordinary walking sticks, hiking walking sticks, he refuses to use anything. I even carried a lovely strong stick and said how great it was for balance, helping me along the uphill walk. NO! He wont use anything that makes him different. I asked him if he wanted to pick one but no he wont even do that. I've got him into a wheelchair 4 times but again a struggle. Hes happy to use the chair lift. It's hard work and I don't know what else to suggest but might he listen to someone else suggesting it?

    Good luck xxx
    when i can think of something profound i will update this.

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      #3
      I was given a walking stick by my OT or Physio (they seem to do much the same thing!). Stick has been invaluable for about a year. Less useful now my arms and hands are weaker.
      Diagnosed October 2020 - See my blog at https://www.myneurodiary.com

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        #4
        I have two sticks I got from amazon, one upstairs and one downstairs. πŸ˜‰πŸ˜ŠπŸ€—πŸ˜œxx
        Bulbar started Jan 2020. Mute and 100% tube fed but mobile and undefeated. Stay Strong πŸ€—πŸ˜˜πŸ€—πŸ˜xx

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          #5
          Be very careful.

          Walking sticks are only ever of use in very very early stages. A stick will never break a fall.

          They are only of use for two things

          1) Early stages to warn others you are unstable
          2) very limited use in the house to aid the other hand holding on to furniture.

          As difficult as it may be, I would recommend using a rollator early.

          These will prevent falls but also possibly keep you out of a wheelchair longer.

          I had one fall using a walking stick and decided to use a rollator. That was 6 years ago and still using a rollator, and still furniture walk around house.

          lee

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            #6
            I can tell my reply won’t be helpful but I found walking sticks a waste of time. I went almost straight to crutches as they offer so much more stability when arms are weak too. I found crutches less embarrassing too as they are less β€œnamby pamby” πŸ™„. There are clever crutches that allow your weight to be taken by the whole forearm.
            Later the Rollator was good
            Diagnosed 18th May 2021 with sporadic ALS. Limb onset. Terrified of not being able to breathe easily.

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              #7
              I was given 2 walking sticks by my OT....a left and a right handed. I use left handed and use other hand for furniture. Only use indoors. (While I can) xx
              Initial diagnosis 7-4-2021 'suspected MND' confirmed by 2nd opinion 4th June 2021 ALS. Began with R foot limp and lots of falls. NIV overnight. Generally weak. Mostly terrified.​​​​​​

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                #8
                My stick has saved me many times. I have zimmers but limited space. Walls and furniture are my good friends. Roll on care home. 🏑πŸ₯πŸ˜πŸ€—xx
                Bulbar started Jan 2020. Mute and 100% tube fed but mobile and undefeated. Stay Strong πŸ€—πŸ˜˜πŸ€—πŸ˜xx

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                  #9
                  Onein300

                  "As difficult as it may be, I would recommend using a rollator early"

                  Did you purchase or OT?
                  Initial diagnosis 7-4-2021 'suspected MND' confirmed by 2nd opinion 4th June 2021 ALS. Began with R foot limp and lots of falls. NIV overnight. Generally weak. Mostly terrified.​​​​​​

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Doggymama View Post
                    Hoping for some advice again from you lovely people. Husband can be unsteady on his feet, walks rather stiffly and has already had one fall. Can anyone recommend a type of walking stick I can get him to help, he has very little use of his right arm and his left is getting quite a lot weaker now. He broke down when OT delivered a bath bench as it screamed 'disabled' at him and he was so upset that I would like to get him a 'nice' one if it was at all possible. He is really struggling to come to terms with his diagnosis and anxiety can be quite overwhelming for him. Thank you for any help as always xx
                    I am in this position now. Walking very gingerly with arms getting progressively weaker. In fact frightened to go out on my own now in case I fall and bash my head on the pavement. Think I would need more than a walking stick but am going to try one. Seeing a physio Friday and will ask his advice and report back.

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                      #11
                      Thank you so much for all the advice and suggestions, not sure how he will think about starting to use a stick, he's rather upset about it all x
                      Carer for my husband who was diagnosed with ALS on 15.12.21.
                      Trying to think of only today and tomorrow
                      Alison β™₯

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Accepting our condition is very hard but it makes us happier. Go figure πŸ€”πŸ˜πŸ˜˜πŸ€—xx
                        Bulbar started Jan 2020. Mute and 100% tube fed but mobile and undefeated. Stay Strong πŸ€—πŸ˜˜πŸ€—πŸ˜xx

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Doggymama You can brink a horse to water, but...

                          I think in your husband's case Alison (just like in many, many other cases), the use of any type of mobility aid will be determined by when he deems one necessary, or circumstances demand he use one or stay in bed all day.

                          What's suitable for one, might be a death trap for another - his OT can assess him and say what is best/safest to use. That said, he obviously can yea or nay any advice, which invariably will not please you 😱😱

                          He is not alone. Although we have a Do Not Fall rule, we tend to ignore it and, it's often after one scare too many, that many of us finally acquiesce and accept the need for a mobility aid (which, ironically, usually gives us back some independence...) 😘
                          ​Diagnosed 03/2007. Sporadic Definite ALS/MND Spinal (hand) Onset.
                          Eye gaze user - No functional limbs - No speech - Feeding tube - Overnight NIV.

                          ​

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                            #14
                            Doggymama - I was so reluctant to use a stick... but got bought a flowery one last September and got used to it. But didn't use it round the house and tried to manage.

                            Unfortunately I didn't manage well since Christmas and several falls (especially backwards which no stick can prevent) have led to me mainly in a wheelchair and with a stick with 4 prongs on the bottom. At 47 I felt really awkward at first... but due to my weakness and falling I ended up having to adapt (yet again!).

                            I really do hope you find a solution before falls become too much of an issue. I tried a rollator but was too weak to use it, but I prefer a wheelchair anyway.
                            Diagnosis confirmed Jan 2022 (age 46) after several years ignored/ misdiagnosed.

                            Symptoms began in left foot 2017. Now mainly left side, speech and some loss on right side too.

                            Unable to walk unaided (powerchair user), poor speech, left hand behaves like a drunk toddler but generally positive and determined.

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                              #15
                              Thank you all so much for your advice and help. I will have to broach the subject gently, and support him with whatever he decides xx
                              Carer for my husband who was diagnosed with ALS on 15.12.21.
                              Trying to think of only today and tomorrow
                              Alison β™₯

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